Blind and Visually Impaired Students Can Perform Computer-Aided Molecular Design with an Assistive Molecular Fabricator

Valère Lounnas, Henry B Wedler, Timothy Newman, Jon Black, Gert Vriend: Blind and Visually Impaired Students Can Perform Computer-Aided Molecular Design with an Assistive Molecular Fabricator. In: Ortuño, Francisco; Rojas, Ignacio (Ed.): Bioinformatics and Biomedical Engineering, pp. 18-29, Springer International Publishing, Cham, 2015, ISBN: 978-3-319-16483-0.

Abstract

Life science in general and chemistry in particular are inaccessible to blind and visually impaired (BVI) students at the exception of very few individuals who have overcome, in a seemingly miraculous way, the hurdles that pave the way to higher education and professional competency. AsteriX-BVI a publicly accessible web server, developed at the Radboud University in the Netherlands already allows BVI scientists to perform a complete series of tasks to automatically manage results of quantum chemical calculations and produce a 3D representation of the optimized structures into a 3D printable, haptic-enhanced format that includes Braille annotations.

BibTeX (Download)

@inproceedings{10.1007/978-3-319-16483-0_3,
title = {Blind and Visually Impaired Students Can Perform Computer-Aided Molecular Design with an Assistive Molecular Fabricator},
author = {Valère Lounnas and Henry B Wedler and Timothy Newman and Jon Black and Gert Vriend},
editor = {Francisco Ortuño and Ignacio Rojas},
url = {https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-16483-0_3},
isbn = {978-3-319-16483-0},
year  = {2015},
date = {2015-01-01},
booktitle = {Bioinformatics and Biomedical Engineering},
pages = {18-29},
publisher = {Springer International Publishing},
address = {Cham},
abstract = {Life science in general and chemistry in particular are inaccessible to blind and visually impaired (BVI) students at the exception of very few individuals who have overcome, in a seemingly miraculous way, the hurdles that pave the way to higher education and professional competency. AsteriX-BVI a publicly accessible web server, developed at the Radboud University in the Netherlands already allows BVI scientists to perform a complete series of tasks to automatically manage results of quantum chemical calculations and produce a 3D representation of the optimized structures into a 3D printable, haptic-enhanced format that includes Braille annotations.},
keywords = {assistive software, blind, Braille, chemistry, computer-aided molecular design, higher education, molecular editor, science, visually impaired},
pubstate = {published},
tppubtype = {inproceedings}
}

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